How to Write an About Page that is SEO-Friendly

About Page Picture
About Page Picture
Credit: Thom Holmes

What is a Good About Page?

A good About page is simple, direct and focuses on a few key elements. Now that this is said, you should always keep in mind that a good about page isn’t about YOU; it’s about your customers and potential customers. You should invest some time when you craft your narrative. Potential clients will often visit this page before making a decision. It helps turn visitors into customers. It builds trust and helps someone make the decision to further their relationship with your brand. A prospective customer could chose to sign up for your newsletter, request a consultation or buy one of your products. 

What to Write in an About Page?

Let’s make the checklist short and sweet. As a business owner, you should present the following elements:

  • who you are as a company (give an idea of the company culture, core values and missions statements)
  • what you offer
  • explain what problems you are going to solve (the why)
  • tell me where you operate
  • give me a timeline that goes with your story (the when)
  • explain the next step to get started with you (the when)

A Content Strategy Primer

Any statement that you make on this page should help show a prospective customer how they will benefit from choosing you over another competing brand. Do not overthink it: share a personal story, some success stories, your social media links and that’s about it. 

What if You Don’t Have an About Page, and Other Questions

  • If you think “About Pages are cliché”, you need to think again. Compelling content about the company mission is important for SEO and not just prospective clients. 
  • If you called it something like “Experience”, please revert back to About Us and treat the content as such. 
  • Be ruthless: prune any corporate jargon. You can unless your inner dork, but your target customers have to be able to understand you.
  • Show your expertise by listing your credentials (certifications, awards, credibility boosters or customer testimonials)
  • List any certifications, awards, or other credibility boosters.
  • Remember, along with your photo, your About page is where I go to figure out who you are and whether or not I like you.

We Need Names and/or Credentials

Unless you are Madonna, you need a last name on that page. If your name is Felix Wu and there are 30 other humans with your name out there, you need to make yourself more memorable because search engines are not always going to show you first. 

What if You Use an Alias?

Google’s got your covered. Some content creators prefer to keep some distance from readers, for security or privacy reasons. Many people work and write under professional pseudonyms. You can, too.

While you’re in there, make sure you’ve listed your credentials all of those things that tell us you actually know your topic. If you’re a registered dietician and you have a nutrition site put that on your About page.

Using Only Video is a Big No-no

Video is a great way to create a quick connexion if people like videos. Hearing a silky voice describe a company for 7 minutes and 30 seconds isn’t necessarily the best way to get information. If you use video on your About page, keep it short, make it interesting and include text for visitors because some people don’t like or can’t watch videos.

Tips for Any Non Content Creators Looking to Create Some About Me Content

  • Use your own authentic voice, it makes marketing lovable
  • Do not shy away from making a bold statement, your About page is not a middle ground or a status quo
  • Avoid stock photos please, curious customers want to see you in action
  • Avoid talking about yourself to yourself, this is a letter to customers, not a corporate love letter full of jargon

How to Make the About Page SEO-friendly?

Your About page is really about your target customers. Your company story should touch on the following elements to help you craft customer-centered content:

  • Tell that person why they should bother reading your site.
  • Talk about the problems you solve.
  • Explain how you can help them.
  • Talk about what interests them.

Yes, this is a place to talk about yourself – but only in a customer service context.

E-A-T Tips to Write Your About Page

  • Include names and bios of staff members
  • Find your words that reflect the trends in your industry
  • Focus on branding
  • Explain your process, methods, etc. 
  • Use keywords
  • Explain any jargon you use in mission statements

E-A-T Content Quality Guidelines Straight From the Official Google Document

Your content should answer the following questions that the Google quality raters ask themselves:

  • Does the content provide original information, reporting, research or analysis?
  • Does the content provide a substantial, complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
  • Does the content provide insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
  • If the content draws on other sources, does it avoid simply copying or rewriting those sources and instead provide substantial additional value and originality?
  • Does the headline and/or page title provide a descriptive, helpful summary of the content?
  • Does the headline and/or page title avoid being exaggerating or shocking in nature?
  • Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
  • Would you expect to see this content in or referenced by a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?

Showing Expertise in Your About Page

  • Does the content present information in a way that makes you want to trust it, such as clear sourcing, evidence of the expertise involved, background about the author or the site that publishes it, such as through links to an author page or a site’s About page?
  • If you researched the site producing the content, would you come away with an impression that it is well-trusted or widely-recognized as an authority on its topic?
  • Is this content written by an expert or enthusiast who demonstrably knows the topic well?
  • Is the content free from easily-verified factual errors?
  • Would you feel comfortable trusting this content for issues related to your money or your life?

Presentation and Style of the Content

  • Is the content free from spelling or stylistic issues?
  • Was the content produced well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
  • Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
  • Does the content have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
  • Does content display well for mobile devices when viewed on them?

How You Measure up Compared to the Competition

  • Does the content provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
  • Does the content seem to be serving the genuine interests of visitors to the site or does it seem to exist solely by someone attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?

To know more about this, feel free to check out this useful list of E-A-T questions along with Google’s official E-A-T guidelines